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BEING A WOMAN

Richmond, IN

Being a Woman

BAW provides Christ-centered conferences & events to empower, enlighten & encourage women around the world!

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DEVOTION

April 23, 2018

If you woke up today, you are blessed.

Having a heart of thanksgiving is the key to happiness and joy unspeakable- the joy that comes from the Lord.

He's not done with you. Take a deep breath, say a prayer of thanksgiving, and go...
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DEVOTION

April 12. 2018
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DEVOTION

April 10, 2018

Never put your trust and faith in people- they will let you down. But, there is One who never fails.Walk in the peace of this truth today!
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DEVOTION

April 4, 2018
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Celebrate Women Month

Ruth and Naomi

The Book of Ruth was probably written about 1010 B.C. by Samuel the Prophet just prior to his death. This book speaks of God’s kindness toward aliens and sojourners of other nations and of His acceptance of those who are humble in spirit, like Ruth most definitely was. This also has great symbolic meaning and points toward the coming Redeemer of those who trust in Him. Ruth could be pictured as the unworthy sinner, cut off from the God of Israel and Boaz as the kinsmen redeemer, prefiguring Christ as the Redeemer.

Ruth 1:16 “Do not urge me to leave you or to return from following you. For where you go I will go, and where you lodge I will lodge. Your people shall be my people, and your God my God.”
This verse could apply to someone who came to saving faith and they could now say your people, the people of God, are now my people and your God will be my God too.

Ruth 1:17-18 “Where you die I will die, and there will I be buried. May the Lord do so to me and more also if anything but death parts me from you.” And when Naomi saw that she was determined to go with her, she said no more.”
What a precious loyalty Ruth shows here to her mother-in-law, Naomi. Naomi tried to dissuade her from going with her but Ruth was determined to go wherever Naomi went. This was somewhat surprising for a Moabite woman to leave her own people and go to a nation (Israel) that considered them a natural enemy.

Ruth 2:10 “Then she fell on her face, bowing to the ground, and said to him, “Why have I found favor in your eyes, that you should take notice of me, since I am a foreigner?”
Ruth, in all her humility, must have pleased God greatly, not to mention, Boaz, who would be her future husband. Here was a Moabite woman, a foreigner, who wanted to live in and become part of the nation of Israel, falling down before Boaz in complete and total submission which is what the sinner must do before the Redeemer, Jesus Christ.

Ruth 2:15-16 “When she rose to glean, Boaz instructed his young men, saying, “Let her glean even among the sheaves, and do not reproach her. And also pull out some from the bundles for her and leave it for her to glean, and do not rebuke her.”
Here is the provision of God as we know that God is the provider of the orphans, the widows, the strangers, and all the poor.

Ruth 3:1 “Then Naomi her mother-in-law said to her, “My daughter, should I not seek rest for you,that it may be well with you?”
Naomi might have been bitter at the loss of her husband and sons but she still cared enough about Ruth to seek rest for her and find a home for her among the Israelites.

Ruth 3:16-17 “And when she came to her mother-in-law, she said, “How did you fare, my daughter?” Then she told her all that the man had done for her, saying, “These six measures of barley he gave to me, for he said to me, ‘You must not go back empty-handed to your mother-in-law.”
Once again, God’s abundant blessing was poured out for these women who couldn’t have possibly provided for themselves. God often uses other people to bless those in need and in this case, God used Boaz and his workers to ensure that Naomi and Ruth would not starve, and even be well provided for with more than enough.
Ruth 4:13-14 “So Boaz took Ruth, and she became his wife. And he went in to her, and the Lord gave her conception, and she bore a son. Then the women said to Naomi, “Blessed be the Lord, who has not left you this day without a redeemer, and may his name be renowned in Israel!”
Just as Christ will wed His betrothed bride, the church, Boaz as the kinsmen redeemer, married Ruth and entered into the lineage of Jesus Christ. This is all about the mercy and grace of God; giving to us what we don’t deserve and abundantly and richly blessing us.

The Book of Ruth might be one of the shortest books in the Bible but it has some of the most powerful verses in the Bible. The analogies between Ruth and the church and between Boaz the kinsmen redeemer and Jesus Christ, our Redeemer, can’t be lost. This is likely the purpose for which this book was written, so that we could read examples of God’s great love for us and see it expressed in the tangible, living history of the nation of Israel.
~Excerpts from an article by Jack Wellman.
~Pastor of the Mulvane Brethren church in Mulvane Kansas. Jack is also the Senior Writer at What Christians Want To Know whose mission is to equip, encourage, and energize Christians and to address questions about the believer’s daily walk with God and the Bible.
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Celebrate Women Month

March 20, 2018

Fanny Crosby (1820-1915)

Francis Jane Crosby was a hymn composer, who did not let her blindness stop her from writing more than 9,000 Christian hymns including “Blessed Assurance,” “Rescue the Perishing,” and “Pass Me Not, O Gentle Savior.” Crosby’s goal was to bring others to Christ. She wrote so many hymns that she was forced to use pen names, otherwise the hymnals would be filled with her name above all others.

"Do you know that if at birth I had been able to make one petition, it would have been that I was born blind?" said the poet, who had been able to see only for her first six weeks of life. "Because when I get to heaven, the first face that shall ever gladden my sight will be that of my Savior."

Born in Putnam County, New York, Crosby became ill within two months. Unfortunately, the family doctor was away, and another man—pretending to be a certified doctor—treated her by prescribing hot mustard poultices to be applied to her eyes. Her illness eventually relented, but the treatment left her blind. When the doctor was revealed to be a quack, he disappeared. A few months later, Crosby's father died. Her mother was forced to find work as a maid to support the family, and Fanny was mostly raised by her Christian grandmother. (Wikipedia)

Her love of poetry began at the early age 8, and it echoed her lifelong refusal to feel sorry for herself:

Oh, what a happy soul I am,
although I cannot see!
I am resolved that in this world
Contented I will be.

How many blessings I enjoy
That other people don't,
To weep and sigh because I'm blind
I cannot, and I won't!

In addition to writing hymns and poetry, Crosby memorized five chapters of the Bible each week. At the age of fifteen, Crosby was sent to the New York Institute for the Blind, which would be her home for 23 years: 12 as a student, 11 as a teacher.

Crosby certainly left her mark on the world.
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Celebrate Women Month

March 19, 2018

Rahab the Prostitute

A woman in ancient Jericho, Rahab the prostitute, saved two spies who had been sent by Joshua to gauge the defenses of the city. Why did Rahab risk her life to save the spies? She and all the other inhabitants of Jericho knew that Joshua and the Hebrew tribes would attack. Rahab did a deal with the spies to save herself and her family.

Rahab helped the spies to escape. They promised that when the city was attacked, she and her family would be saved. Safely escaping the city, the two spies returned to Joshua and reported that the "whole land was melting with fear." The Israelites crossed the Jordan into Canaan where they laid siege to the city of Jericho. The city was completely destroyed, and every man, woman, and child in it was killed. Only Rahab and her family were spared. Ultimately, Rahab married Salmon, an Israelite from the tribe of Judah.

Rahab’s son was Boaz, the husband of Ruth. Joseph, the legal father of Jesus, is her direct descendant. Rahab has special significance for Christians: she is among the four women listed in Matthew’s gospel as ancestors of Jesus of Nazareth. The others are Ruth, Tamar and Bathsheba.

God can use anyone and He has, and He will. While other godly people might not have given the time of day to a prostitute, God knew her heart. He trusted her with His anointed men. What about today? Are we willing to welcome in and work with the dirty, the non-believer, the sick, the drug addicted, the homeless, and even the prostitute? Or do we judge them unworthy of our time?

The story of Rahab is found in the Book of Joshua.
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March 14, 2018

Mavis Staples: Gospel Singer

When Mavis Staples sings, her deep, spiritual voice soothes wounded souls and brings hope to those facing challenges. The words to "I'll Take You There," the 1972 hit made famous by Staples and her family, the Staple Singers, were a healing balm for a fractured nation. The Vietnam War and the volatile 1960s had just ended—a decade highlighted by strife and the civil rights movement. Staples and her family sang in the middle of it. Her father, Roebuck "Pops" Staples, befriended Martin Luther King Jr., whom the Staples family often joined for rallies and marches, singing freedom songs like "Long Walk to D.C." and "Why Am I Treated So Bad?"

Long after Pops died and the Staple Singers faded, Staples kept making music—three albums in the 1970s, three in the '80s, two in the '90s, and four in this millennium. Her most recent, You Are Not Alone, won a Grammy for Best Americana Album in 2010.

Her music remains focused on love, hope, and justice. Over many decades, she has helped introduce the gospel to millions.

"People need to know that even though they may not be able to change their circumstances, they themselves can be changed," she told CT. "Prayer changes things. God changes things. And if you'll let him, God is able to carry you through."—Tamela Mann, actress and gospel singer
-Christianitytoday.com
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March 12, 2018

Mother Teresa

Mother Teresa, born of Albanian descent in Skopje (now the Republic of Macedonia) August 26, 1910, was known in the Catholic Church as Saint Teresa of Calcutta. She died September 5,1997. She was a Roman Catholic nun and missionary. After living in Macedonia for eighteen years she moved to Ireland and then to India, where she lived for most of her life.

In 1950 Teresa founded the Missionaries of Charity, a Roman Catholic religious congregation which had over 4,500 sisters and was active in 133 countries in 2012. The congregation manages homes for people dying of HIV/AIDS, leprosy and tuberculosis; soup kitchens; dispensaries and mobile clinics; children's- and family-counselling programs; orphanages, and schools. Members, who take vows of chastity, poverty, and obedience, also profess a fourth vow: to give "wholehearted free service to the poorest of the poor".

Mother Teresa received a number of honors, including the 1962 Ramon Magsaysay Peace Prize and 1979 Nobel Peace Prize. She was canonized (recognized by the church as a saint) on September 4, 2016.

A controversial figure during her life and after her death, she was admired by many for her charitable work. She was both praised and criticized for her opposition to abortion.

Mother Teresa was a very humble woman who devoted herself to the service of others less fortunate. We can learn from her selfless giving to many, forsaking her own needs and comforts. Jesus came to save us from our sins and to show us a true servant’s heart. Mother Teresa emulated His characteristics from a very young age, until her death.
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Happy International Women's History Month
(BAW2006~Being A Woman Raised Up!
Dondo, Mozambique, Africa)
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March 8, 2018

Hannah’s Sacrifice

Hannah was barren. She wanted a son more than anything, but God had not granted her one. In those days, it was very important to have a son to carry on the family name. Hannah begged the Lord for a child. She made a promise to dedicate this young man to God’s service. God granted her the desire of her heart and she gave birth to a son, Samuel. Hannah followed through on her promise and took her boy to Eli the priest and left him to be raised in the Temple. Hannah continued to have influence over the boy’s life through the years.

Her son grew up to be Samuel—one of the most influential and godly men in the Bible.

“But Samuel was ministering before the Lord—a boy wearing a linen ephod. Each year his mother made him a little robe and took it to him when she went up with her husband to offer the annual sacrifice. Eli would bless Elkanah and his wife, saying, “May the Lord give you children by this woman to take the place of the one she prayed for and gave to the Lord.” Then they would go home. And the Lord was gracious to Hannah; she gave birth to three sons and two daughters. Meanwhile, the boy Samuel grew up in the presence of the Lord.” 1 Samuel 2:18-21

Because Hannah was faithful in keeping her promise to God and willing to sacrifice something so very valuable to her, God multiplied her blessings.
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